Online Identity Crisis

Online Identity Crisis

Episode 4

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Alan & Craig took a hard look at their online counterparts and whether it’s better to be Neo or Thomas A. Anderson.

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(An anonymous 15.8 Mb, 34:26)

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View our real names, passwords and bank account details by reading the extended show notes!


Show Notes

00:28    The many names of CPWilson aka buddySideshow & AGKuma the Artist formerly known as LordAlan

01:00    Origin Stories

02:40    Sum 41 Rules &  the ways of Old: Don’t give out your name

04:10    Now your full name is an integral part of the online brand

04:49    Twitter Identity infringement & The Case of The Many GirlGeeks

06:16    Trademarking names with Microsoft and Apple

06:56    Twitter spambots (infographic on the site)

07:53    The Great Twitter Bank Heist and security questions

08:40    Please Rob Me

09:31    @RamEmanuel & @CatBinLady

10:18    Go to our damn funny website

10:47    No joking around on Facebook profiles

14:41    Michael Anti, a Chinese blogger whose legal name is Zhao Jing, is banned from Facebook for his pseudonym

15:25    TechCrunch, World of Warcraft & RealIDs

19:46    Come to Facebook, where everyone knows your name

20:40    I actually say “anonymity” earlier perfectly fine. Go to A lil bit of Youtube Sunshine

21:59    Boy is dick on EA forum. Boy gets banned from BioWare game.

23:50    Wait a minute, there’s bad language on XBOX Live?!

26:36    Character creation as extension of personal identification. Only kidding, it’s a bald joke

27:43    The gap between your eyebrows and in SecondLife

30:00    Wait a minute, female videogame characters have huge whats?!

31:49    How to remove anonymity by naming and shaming when gaming

34:10    Outro: Send us suggestions at mailbag@split-screen.net and leave us an iTunes review!

[Be Kind, Rewind and Leave an iTunes Review]


Additional recommended reading:

Arianna Reiche on anonymity with women in technology

The Border House’s look at the misogynist language used on major gaming sites